Environment

Urban Water Series Technical Master Classes Please join us on April 26 and/ or April 27 for a series of lectures and workshops to deepen the technical knowledge of private and public sector professionals to improve their ability to design, develop, install, and maintain green infrastructure for a vibrant region. Rainy Days: Integrating Building & Site Design for...
April 2017 Website

Urban Water Series Technical Master Classes

Please join us on April 26 and/ or April 27 for a series of lectures and workshops to deepen the technical knowledge of private and public sector professionals to improve their ability to design, develop, install, and maintain green infrastructure for a vibrant region.

Rainy Days: Integrating Building & Site Design for Better Stormwater Management

Free Public Lecture, Wednesday, April 26, 5:30 – 7:00pm
The Center for Philanthropy, 919 St. Charles Avenue
REGISTER HERE

A team of experts from Wisconsin: architect Vince Micha, site planner/ landscape architect Tom Mortensen, and civil engineer Paul McIlheran will present an idea-rich discussion on an approach to more effective and environmentally responsible design for stormwater management. Based on the philosophy that Nature Ignores Designs That Ignore Nature, the team will explain how their collaborative approach contributes to better building, site, and landscape designs and projects.

Collaborative Design Techniques for Stormwater Integration

Thursday, April 27, 8:30am – 1:00pm
The Center for Philanthropy, 919 St. Charles Avenue
REGISTER HERE

$45 for half-day master class, $30 for AIA, ASLA, and ASCE members. Price includes breakfast, lunch and parking. Continuing education credits can be earned for AIA, ASLA, and ASCE.

The Technical Master Class is for architects, landscape architects, civil engineers, and municipal staff.

Technical Master Class Overview

Architects, landscape architects, and civil engineers typically have minimal contact during the early stages of design, which often leads to missed opportunities and sub-optimal outcomes. Learn how architect Vince Micha, landscape architect Tom Mortensen, and civil engineer Paul McIlheran have improved the collaborative process with Pattern Writing, a design technique that creates a deeper understanding of how a building and site can work together. They will share examples of relevant built projects, review case studies illustrating their collaborative design style, and discuss how their process can be applied to local projects.

  • Vince Micha, AIA is senior project architect at The Kubala Washatko Architects, Inc. (TKWA – Cedarburg, WI). Vince is one of TKWA’s most experienced architects with specific expertise in managing complex, multi-discipline projects in the areas of adaptive re-use, rehabilitation, and application of historic tax credits, religious institutions, hospitality, retail, and multi-family housing.
  • Tom Mortensen, PLA, ASLA of R.A. Smith National (Brookfield, WI) is a site planner and landscape architect with over 30 years of experience in landscape architecture and related design and construction professions. Tom’s experience includes expertise in the areas of site planning, urban spaces, park and public open space design, and restoration plans and construction management.
  • Paul McIlheran, PE, CPSWQ of R.A. Smith National (Brookfield, Wisconsin) has over 20 years of civil engineering design experience in retail, commercial, health care and residential site development, and he specializes in stormwater management planning and design.

Thank you to the Surdna Foundation for its support of the Urban Water Series!

Thank you as well to our Technical Master Class partners: American Institute of Architects, Downtown Development District, Gaea Consultants, GNO Inc., Jefferson Parish, LA Urban Stormwater Coalition, Regional Planning Commission, Sewerage & Water Board of New Orleans, St. Bernard Parish Public Works, St. Tammany Parish, Tulane Institute on Water Resources, Law & Policy, Urban Land Institute, Water Collaborative of Greater New Orleans, and Louisiana Water Economy Network.

Have questions about the Urban Water Series? Please email Johanna Paine.

Urban Water Series History

Phase 1: In the summer of 2013, the Foundation invited national experts on green infrastructure and stormwater management from five vanguard U.S. cities to share their learnings and strategies about green infrastructure and stormwater management through a series of five workshops. Watch the videos of these workshops.

Phase 2: In the fall of 2014, 25 city government and nonprofit leaders interested in water management issues visited Austin, Philadelphia, and Milwaukee to experience firsthand how these cities scaled their green infrastructure and stormwater management strategies.

Phase 3: In the winter of 2016, the Greater New Orleans Foundation began a series of  lectures and workshops to deepen the technical knowledge of private and public sector professionals to improve their ability to design, develop, install, and maintain green infrastructure for a vibrant region.

Grants supporting urban water management

$25,000 to KIPP New Orleans for reconstructing the KIPP Central City Primary (KCCP) schoolyard to add green infrastructure and stormwater management features.

$58,800 to support the Greater New Orleans Water Collaborative hiring a full-time coordinator.

$10,000 to FirstLine Schools for the addition of a water management curriculum to the school’s Edible Schoolyard New Orleans program.

$39,000 to the Louisiana Office of the Trust for Public Lands for the development of a web-based decision support tool that will allow the prioritization of green infrastructure locations in New Orleans based on environmental, social, and economic parameters.

$25,000 to Urban Strategies to support the design of green infrastructure and of educational programs for the Lafon Park Stormwater Management and Public Education Demonstration Project.

Partners

Surdna Foundation

Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans

City of New Orleans

New Orleans faces two unique challenges related to urban water. First, it is the third rainiest city in the United States, with 56 days of rain contributing to 64 inches of rainfall on average every year. Second, soil subsidence poses a significant challenge to the city and causes issues like uneven streets and potholes. New Orleans includes many neighborhoods with compressed soils that are subsiding at a rate of up to one-third of an inch annually, with certain areas subsiding at a rate of over an inch per year.

While New Orleans is increasingly protected from storm-surge flooding thanks to heightened levee protection, neighborhoods are becoming increasingly susceptible to rain runoff flooding, particularly as soil subsidence and storm severity increases. In this environment, the design and regulation of interior conveyors of stormwater including streets, public spaces, and private properties is just as important as perimeter defenses such as levees, flood gates, and wetlands. This is commonly referred to as green infrastructure and stormwater management.