Environment

Louisiana’s coast is eroding at an alarming rate of around one football field per hour. Moreover, the Louisiana coast faces the highest rate of sea level rise worldwide with New Orleans projected to be under water by 2100. Although there is general awareness of coastal issues such as coastal erosion and sea level rise, there...
Coastal-Issues

Louisiana’s coast is eroding at an alarming rate of around one football field per hour. Moreover, the Louisiana coast faces the highest rate of sea level rise worldwide with New Orleans projected to be under water by 2100. Although there is general awareness of coastal issues such as coastal erosion and sea level rise, there is a need to further educate coastal communities about these issues and how it affects them.  Another reality is that government agencies have not effectively engaged coastal communities before developing policies and plans that affect these communities.

The Foundation envisions a thriving 13-parish Southeast Louisiana region that is educated about the issues and risks facing them due to coastal land loss and sea level rise. This awareness leads coastal communities to support coastal restoration and protection efforts and make informed decisions regarding actions they need to take based on the risks that they face. The Foundation envisions a state government that prioritizes coastal restoration and protection efforts while ensuring the vitality and safety of their constituent communities.

Strategy

In order to achieve this vision, the Foundation strives to support organizations that:

  • Deepen the knowledge of Southeast Louisiana communities that will be affected by coastal land loss and sea level rise on coastal issues and various coastal restoration and protection efforts
  • Help government agencies engage more effectively with at-risk coastal communities in Southeast Louisiana
  • Advocate on a parish and state level to ensure that:
    • Coastal restoration remains a funding priority
    • Coastal communities, especially underserved populations, are harmed as little as possible due to coastal restoration and protection activities and that these populations are properly engaged in planning these activities
    • Coastal restoration and protection activities are science- and data-based
  • Serve as a watchdog to track the state and federal funding flows involving BP oil spill reparations and coastal restoration and ensure accountability and efficiency
  • Start the conversation about how to plan for and execute future transitions among policymakers, government practitioners, and at-risk coastal communities, and, when appropriate, help coastal communities adapt to such transitions

Aside from the funding support the Foundation provides to nonprofit organizations working on the Gulf Coast, the Foundation helps build the capacity of these organizations through its Organizational Effectiveness work. The Foundation also leverages funds from its Environmental Fund to raise more funds for these strategies.

Grants

$20,000 to United Houma Nation for leadership development and tribal training on coastal issues and effective decision-making in order to increase the tribe’s capacity and confidence in engaging in coastal issues.

$20,000 to Bayou Grace to expand local volunteer restoration engagement and engage residents in education activities on land loss, coastal restoration, and hazard preparation.

$20,000 to Bayou Interfaith Sponsoring Committee to fund general operating expenses as well as community convening, organizing, advocacy, and strategic partnership activities around coastal restoration and protection.

$20,000 to Louisiana Appleseed to implement education and advocacy activities that will streamline and review the system to remove legal hurdles involving title clearing in coastal communities.

$20,000 to Lower Ninth Ward – Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development to (a) create and launch a residential and community coalition that will engage the Lower Ninth Ward community in a restoration and ecosystems project designed to protect and enhance targeted species, landscape, and water systems for the betterment of the Lower Ninth Ward and (b) create the Lower Ninth Ward Neighborhood Resiliency Program with training workshops focused on environmental and water management education.

$20,000 to Southeast Louisiana Legal Services to convene Isle de Jean Charles tribe leaders to develop an advocacy strategy and work plan to achieve the tribe’s goals and provide leadership training.

$30,000 to WWNO to operate the Coastal Desk.

Partners

blue moon fund